2015 IRS Refund Cycle Chart for 2014 Tax Year

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2015 IRS Refund Cycle Chart and e-file payment information.

Getting excited for the 2015 Tax Season? We are to, get prepared by estimating your 2014 Tax Return with our 2015 Tax Refund Calculator.

2014 IRS E-File Cycle ChartThis is the schedule for 2015 IRS Refund Cycle Chart. Direct Deposit and Check date’s below. Please see disclaimer. 2015 tax refund schedule is listed below for information purposes. Find out when you’re state income tax refund will be in. If you use our schedule on your webpage, please drop us a link. January 23rd, 2015 is the first day of tax season 2015. Show your support by liking and sharing Refund Schedule on Facebook.

The I.R.S will begin accepting tax returns January 23rd, 2015.

For those who have asked, 2014 Tax Refunds Will Not Be Delayed Until October 2015. Get the “Where’s my refund?” app on Android & Apple IPhone/IPad/IPod App

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Jun 10

2014 IRS Refund Cycle Chart for 2013 Tax Year

2014 IRS Refund Cycle Chart and e-file payment information.

This is a schedule for 2014 IRS Refund Cycle Chart. Direct Deposit and Check date’s below. Please see disclaimer. 2014 tax refund schedule is listed below for information purposes. This is just for the first week. Find out when you’re state income tax refund will be in. 

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Mar 06

When should you file 2012 Income Tax Return?

 When should you file your 2012 Income Tax Return?

2012 Income Tax Return

The tax law sets deadlines for filing 2012 income tax returns. However, there is room to maneuver, and the time you choose to file depends on your personal situation. Here are some guidelines to help you decide on the best time for you to file your return.

File early


The filing season for 2012 income tax returns officially opened in end of January 2013 when the IRS began to accept electronically-filed returns. Most individuals do not file before the beginning of February in order to receive information returns, such as W-2s and 1099s, which are usually sent to taxpayers at the end of January; this information is needed to complete the return. Continue reading

Feb 05

Income Tax Refund Calendar 2012

2012 IRS e-file cycle chart and payment information.

Direct Deposit and Check date’s below. Please see disclaimer.

 

IRS accepts your return (by 11:00 am) between…*Projected Direct Deposit Sent*Projected Paper Check Mailed*
January 30, 2013
2/6/2013
2/8/2013
January 31
and
February 6, 2013
2/13/2013
2/15/2013
February 9
and
February 13, 2013
2/20/2013
2/22/2013
February 16
and
February 20, 2013
2/27/2013
3/1/2013
February 23
and
February 27, 2013
3/6/2013
3/8/2013
March 1
and
March 6, 2013
3/13/2013
3/15/2013
March 8
and
March 13, 2013
3/20/2013
3/22/2013
March 15
and
March 20, 2013
3/27/2013
3/29/2013
March 22
and
March 27, 2013
4/3/2013
4/5/2013
March 29
and
April 3, 2013
4/10/2013
4/12/2013
April 5
and
April 10, 2013
4/17/2013
4/19/2013
April 12
and
April 17, 2013
4/24/2013
4/26/2013
April 19
and
April 24, 2013
5/1/2013
5/3/2013
April 26
and
May 1, 2013
5/8/2013
5/10/2013
May 3
and
May 8, 2013
5/15/2013
5/17/2013
May 10
and
May 15, 2013
5/22/2013
5/24/2013
May 17
and
May 22, 2013
5/29/2013
5/31/2013
May 24
and
May 29, 2013
6/5/2013
6/7/2013
May 31
and
June 5, 2013
6/12/2013
6/14/2013 Continue reading
Jan 10

Late Start for I.R.S. 2012 Income Tax Processing

Bad news coming out of the IRS today. The IRS will not start processing 2012 Income Tax Returns until January 30th, 2013.

Here is the article from the IRS:

IRS Plans Jan. 30 Tax Season Opening For 1040 Filers

IR-2013-2, Jan. 8, 2013

WASHINGTON — Following the January tax law changes made by Congress under the American Taxpayer Relief Act (ATRA), the Internal Revenue Service announced today it plans to open the 2013 filing season and begin processing individual income tax returns on Jan. 30.

The IRS will begin accepting tax returns on that date after updating forms and completing programming and testing of its processing systems. This will reflect the bulk of the late tax law changes enacted Jan. 2. The announcement means that the vast majority of tax filers — more than 120 million households — should be able to start filing tax returns starting Jan 30.

The IRS estimates that remaining households will be able to start filing in late February or into March because of the need for more extensive form and processing systems changes. This group includes people claiming residential energy credits, depreciation of property or general business credits. Most of those in this group file more complex tax returns and typically file closer to the April 15 deadline or obtain an extension.

“We have worked hard to open tax season as soon as possible,” IRS Acting Commissioner Steven T. Miller said. “This date ensures we have the time we need to update and test our processing systems.”

The IRS will not process paper tax returns before the anticipated Jan. 30 opening date. There is no advantage to filing on paper before the opening date, and taxpayers will receive their tax refunds much faster by using e-file with direct deposit.

“The best option for taxpayers is to file electronically,” Miller said.

The opening of the filing season follows passage by Congress of an extensive set of tax changes in ATRA on Jan. 1, 2013, with many affecting tax returns for 2012. While the IRS worked to anticipate the late tax law changes as much as possible, the final law required that the IRS update forms and instructions as well as make critical processing system adjustments before it can begin accepting tax returns.

The IRS originally planned to open electronic filing this year on Jan. 22; more than 80 percent of taxpayers filed electronically last year.

Who Can File Starting Jan. 30?

The IRS anticipates that the vast majority of all taxpayers can file starting Jan. 30, regardless of whether they file electronically or on paper. The IRS will be able to accept tax returns affected by the late Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) patch as well as the three major “extender” provisions for people claiming the state and local sales tax deduction, higher education tuition and fees deduction and educator expenses deduction.

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